SOBC Symposium at the Association for Psychological Science

The Association for Psychological Science (APS) hosted a symposium and panel discussion titled “Behavior Change Across the Life-Span” on Saturday, May 26, at its annual meeting in San Francisco. Drs. Lis Nielsen and Jennifer Sumner co-chaired the event, which furthered SOBC’s mission by demonstrating the method’s relevance and value for scientists outside of the SOBC Research Network members. The symposium was motivated by the idea that the SOBC research mission is enhanced by investigating mechanisms of change during each of life’s phases. Collectively, these researchers consider how modifiable behaviors shape health outcomes across the entire human lifespan.

read more »

 

Workshop on Implementation of Digital Health Interventions

The National Cancer Institute (NCI), in collaboration with Cancer Research U.K. (CRUK), will host a “Sandpit” workshop (i.e., ideas lab) on October 28-31, 2018, in Potomac, Maryland.

 

WORKSHOP BACKGROUND

This intensive residential workshop will bring together a broad, multidisciplinary group of participants to generate new insights on the contextual factors (e.g., social, cultural, and organizational) that influence the implementation and uptake of digital health interventions for cancer prevention. The research ideas generated at the workshop will inform dissemination and implementation efforts, with the ultimate goal of increasing the reach, adoption, and maintained use of digital health tools. On the last day of the workshop, CRUK will invite up to four of the teams formed at the workshop to apply for CRUK seed grants to test the feasibility of their ideas.

read more »

 

June 26, 2018 | Lisa Feldman Barrett, PhD Presents: Emotions inside out: From cartoon neuroscience to the predictive brain

Lisa Feldman Barrett, PhD, is University Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Director of the Interdisciplinary Affective Science Laboratory (IASLab) at Northeastern University, with research appointments at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital. Her research focuses on the nature of emotion from both psychological and neuroscience perspectives. Dr. Barrett is the recipient of numerous research awards, including the 2018 APS Lifetime Mentor Award and the NIH Director’s Pioneer Award for transformative research. She is an elected fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Association for Psychological Science, as well as several other scientific societies. Her research has been continuously funded by NIH and NSF for 20 years. Dr. Barrett also educates lawyers, judges and other legal actors about emotion, neuroscience and the law as part of her work for the Center for Law, Brain and Behavior. In addition to publishing over 200 peer reviewed papers and 50 book chapters, Dr. Barrett has testified before US Congress in support of basic behavioral research funding and has edited five volumes, including the 4th edition of the Handbook of Emotion, published by Guilford Press. Her book, How emotions are made:  The secret life of the brain, is published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

read more »

 

SOBC Spotlight: Interview with Amy Slep, PhD and Richard Heyman, PhD

In this Spotlight feature we focus of Amy Slep, PhD and Richard Heyman, PhD, Clinical Psychologists and Professors in the College of Dentistry at New York University. They co-direct the Family Translational Research Group. Their SOBC research examines patterns of coercive processes within parent-child and couple dyads. These coercive processes, if engaged frequently, are believed to lead to poor consequences for health behaviors such as tooth brushing, eating, and drinking.
read more »

 

May 15, 2018 | OBSSR Director’s Webinar Presents: Linda K. Larkey, Ph.D., CRTT on Biopsychosocial effects of Meditative Movement (Qigong/Tai Chi) on breast cancer survivor’s fatigue and other symptoms.

Time: 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. (ET)

Register: Register for this online only event.

 

Linda K. Larkey, Ph.D., CRTT, has a notable funded research record in multiple intervention approaches to promote cancer screenings in multiple clinic and community settings. Her more recently NIH-funded projects explore the biopsychosocial effects of Tai Chi Easy/Qigong on breast cancer survivor’s fatigue, cognitive function and other symptoms. Biomarker assessments include cortisol, inflammatory cytokines complemented with self-report and objective performance and cognitive function measures. Dr. Larkey’s more recent and current work nicely models OBSSR-desired grantspersonship and researcher behavior. Larkey is professor in Arizona State University’s College of Nursing and Health Innovation and adjunct faculty with Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ. Dr. Larkey will review the broader evidence (from her own work and others’) on Meditative Movement (MM) effects on cancer survivorship, supporting the goals of her research underway in breast cancer survivors. Extended models proposing various biomolecular and neurophysiological markers as mechanisms of effects on physical and emotional symptoms, cognitive function and body composition outcomes will be discussed.

 

 

New NIH Adherence FOAs published

These new funding opportunities on Adherence direct people to SOBC resources and encourage their use:

Improving Patient Adherence to Treatment and Prevention Regimens to Promote Health

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-18-722.html  –  R01

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-18-723.html  – R21

 

This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is being issued by the NIH Adherence Network through the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) with participation from multiple NIH Institutes and Centers. This FOA calls for research grant applications which address patient adherence to treatment and prevention regimens in healthcare to promote health outcomes. This FOA accepts applications that either propose or do not propose a clinical trial(s).

Applications under this FOA are encouraged, but not required, to apply approaches and tools developed under the NIH Common Fund’s Science of Behavior Change (SOBC) Program. These include: use-inspired basic research on mechanisms of change at multiple levels of analysis; assays for self-regulation, interpersonal processes and stress that have evidence as malleable targets for behavior change (see https://osf.io/zp7b4) developed under the SOBC program; and an experimental medicine approach which requires a clear a priori specification of the intended mechanistic target(s) of an intervention, and methods that test the degree to which an experimental manipulation or intervention engages those targets.

For more information about the SOBC program, please see: https://commonfund.nih.gov/behaviorchange.