February 26, 2019 | Linda Collins PhD Presents: Introduction to the Multiphase Optimization Strategy for Building Better Behavioral and Biobehavioral Interventions

Linda M. Collins, Ph.D., is Distinguished Professor of Human Development & Family Studies at the Pennsylvania State University, United States. She is also Director of The Methodology Center, an interdisciplinary research center devoted to the advancement and dissemination of quantitative methods for applications in drug abuse prevention and treatment, as well as other areas in the behavioral sciences. Dr. Collins’s research interests include the multiphase optimization strategy (MOST), an engineering-inspired methodological framework for optimizing and evaluating behavioral, biobehavioral, and biomedical interventions. The objective of MOST is to improve intervention effectiveness, efficiency, economy, and scalability. Dr. Collins is currently collaborating on research applying MOST to develop optimized behavioral interventions in the areas of smoking cessation, weight loss, prevention of excessive drinking and risky sex in college students, and HIV services. Her research has been funded by NIDA, NCI, NIDDK, and NIAAA.

Calling Info:

Meeting URL: https://meetings.webex.com/collabs/#/meetings/joinbynumber

Meeting Number: 191 366 190

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March 18, 2019 | Pamela Herd PhD Presents: Social and Population Health Science Approaches to Understanding the Human Gut Microbiome

Event Date: March 18, 2019 at 2pm EST

The microbiome is now considered our “second genome,” with potentially comparable importance to the genome in determining human health. There is, however, a relatively limited understanding of the broader environmental factors, particularly social conditions, that shape variation in human microbial communities. Fulfilling the promise of microbiome research—particularly the microbiome’s potential for modification—will require collaboration between biologists and social and population scientists. For life scientists, the plasticity and adaptiveness of the microbiome calls for an agenda to understand the sensitivity of the microbiome to broader social environments already known to be powerful predictors of morbidity and mortality. For social and population scientists, attention to the microbiome may help elucidate nagging questions as to the underlying biological mechanisms that link social conditions to health. We outline key substantive and methodological advances that can be made if collaborations between social and population health scientists and life scientists are strategically pursued, as well as provide a recent example of just such a collaboration.

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December 17, 2018 | Mary Dozier PhD Presents: Defining and Monitoring Intervention Fidelity with Precision in a Home Visitation Model

Mary Dozier is Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences at the University of Delaware. She obtained her Ph.D. from Duke University in 1983. She was named the Amy E. DuPont Chair in Child Development in 2007, and in 2016 was named the Francis Alison Professor, the university’s highest faculty honor. Over the last 25 years, she has studied the development of young children in foster care and young children living with neglecting birth parents, examining challenges in attachment and regulatory capabilities. Along with her graduate students and research team, she developed an intervention, Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up, that targets specific issues that have been identified as problematic for young children who have experienced adversity. This intervention has been shown to enhance children’s ability to form secure attachments, and to regulate physiology and behavior normatively, among other things. She received the International Congress on Infant Studies’ Translational Research Award in 2018, and has been named the 2019 recipient of the APA Urie Bronfenbrenner Award for Lifetime Contribution in Developmental Psychology in the Service of Science and Society.

Calling Information: 

Meeting Number: 190 372 314

 

October 23, 2018 | Karolina Lempert PhD Presents: Experimental Manipulations of Intertemporal Choice: Successes and Limitations

Karolina Lempert, Ph.D. is a postdoctoral scholar at the University of Pennsylvania, affiliated with the Department of Psychology and the Penn Memory Center. She earned her PhD in psychology from New York University, where she was a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow. Her undergraduate degree is in neurobiology from Harvard University. Dr. Lempert’s research examines the individual differences, situational factors, and neural mechanisms that influence intertemporal choices, or choices with consequences that play out over time. She uses a neuroeconomics approach, combining paradigms from behavioral economics with methodological techniques including neuroimaging and psychophysiology. She is the recipient of a Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award from the National Institute on Aging.

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August 20, 2018 | OBSSR Director’s Webinar Presents: Russell Poldrack, Ph.D., on Toward data-driven ontologies for mental function

Time: Monday, August 20, 2018 1:00 pm (EST)
Register for this online only event.

Russell A. Poldrack is the Albert Ray Lang Professor in the Department of Psychology and Professor (by courtesy) of Computer Science at Stanford University, and Director of the Stanford Center for Reproducible Neuroscience. His research uses neuroimaging to understand the brain systems underlying decision making and executive function. His lab is also engaged in the development of neuroinformatics tools to help improve the reproducibility and transparency of neuroscience, including the Openneuro.org and Neurovault.org data sharing projects and the Cognitive Atlas ontology.

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Workshop on Implementation of Digital Health Interventions

The National Cancer Institute (NCI), in collaboration with Cancer Research U.K. (CRUK), will host a “Sandpit” workshop (i.e., ideas lab) on October 28-31, 2018, in Potomac, Maryland.

 

WORKSHOP BACKGROUND

This intensive residential workshop will bring together a broad, multidisciplinary group of participants to generate new insights on the contextual factors (e.g., social, cultural, and organizational) that influence the implementation and uptake of digital health interventions for cancer prevention. The research ideas generated at the workshop will inform dissemination and implementation efforts, with the ultimate goal of increasing the reach, adoption, and maintained use of digital health tools. On the last day of the workshop, CRUK will invite up to four of the teams formed at the workshop to apply for CRUK seed grants to test the feasibility of their ideas.

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June 26, 2018 | Lisa Feldman Barrett, PhD Presents: Emotions inside out: From cartoon neuroscience to the predictive brain

Lisa Feldman Barrett, PhD, is University Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Director of the Interdisciplinary Affective Science Laboratory (IASLab) at Northeastern University, with research appointments at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital. Her research focuses on the nature of emotion from both psychological and neuroscience perspectives. Dr. Barrett is the recipient of numerous research awards, including the 2018 APS Lifetime Mentor Award and the NIH Director’s Pioneer Award for transformative research. She is an elected fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Association for Psychological Science, as well as several other scientific societies. Her research has been continuously funded by NIH and NSF for 20 years. Dr. Barrett also educates lawyers, judges and other legal actors about emotion, neuroscience and the law as part of her work for the Center for Law, Brain and Behavior. In addition to publishing over 200 peer reviewed papers and 50 book chapters, Dr. Barrett has testified before US Congress in support of basic behavioral research funding and has edited five volumes, including the 4th edition of the Handbook of Emotion, published by Guilford Press. Her book, How emotions are made:  The secret life of the brain, is published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

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May 15, 2018 | OBSSR Director’s Webinar Presents: Linda K. Larkey, Ph.D., CRTT on Biopsychosocial effects of Meditative Movement (Qigong/Tai Chi) on breast cancer survivor’s fatigue and other symptoms.

Time: 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. (ET)

Register: Register for this online only event.

 

Linda K. Larkey, Ph.D., CRTT, has a notable funded research record in multiple intervention approaches to promote cancer screenings in multiple clinic and community settings. Her more recently NIH-funded projects explore the biopsychosocial effects of Tai Chi Easy/Qigong on breast cancer survivor’s fatigue, cognitive function and other symptoms. Biomarker assessments include cortisol, inflammatory cytokines complemented with self-report and objective performance and cognitive function measures. Dr. Larkey’s more recent and current work nicely models OBSSR-desired grantspersonship and researcher behavior. Larkey is professor in Arizona State University’s College of Nursing and Health Innovation and adjunct faculty with Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ. Dr. Larkey will review the broader evidence (from her own work and others’) on Meditative Movement (MM) effects on cancer survivorship, supporting the goals of her research underway in breast cancer survivors. Extended models proposing various biomolecular and neurophysiological markers as mechanisms of effects on physical and emotional symptoms, cognitive function and body composition outcomes will be discussed.