October 28, 2020 | APS Connects – Journal Club paper | Does episodic future thinking repair immediacy bias at home and in the laboratory in patients with prediabetes?

Please join the next APS Connects meeting on Wednesday, October 28 at 2:00 pm EasternAPS Connects – Journal Club paper:  “Does episodic future thinking repair immediacy bias at home and in the laboratory in patients with prediabetes?”  Published in the Sept 2020 issue of Psychosomatic Medicine.  APS members can read the article in the latest issue of the Journal, either in your paper copy or on the Journal website.

Join APS Connects at the following link:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84916214581?pwd=dEpZTjhTdVp5bGIvL0NFM2Jxa1h2QT09

 

Meeting ID: 849 1621 4581

Password: 784615

 

To dial in use: 312-626-6799 or 646-876-9923

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Celebrating successes and next steps for the Science of Behavior Change Program

We all know first-hand how tough it can be to adopt and maintain healthy behaviors, even though we know that poor health behaviors account for a good portion of the disease burden in the United States.

 

In response to this challenge, NIH launched the Science of Behavior Change (SOBC) Common Fund Program in 2009. The program was established with two major long-term goals: 1) to promote a systematic approach to discovering the mechanisms underlying successful behavior change, and 2) to provide blueprints for developing behavior interventions that could reliably improve health outcomes.

 

Over the past 10 years, under the leadership of co-chairs Dr. Richard J. Hodes, director, NIA; and Dr. Patricia Grady, former director, National Institute of Nursing Research, SOBC has hosted several scientific workshops and annual meetings of investigators and supported 48 awards and administrative supplements. You can learn more about the work of SOBC’s network of researchers in special issues of Behavioural Research and Therapy (February 2018), Health Psychology Review (February 2020), and Health Psychology (September 2020).

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October 2, 2020 | SBM Webinar on Climate Change, Behavior Change, and Health: Tackling Global Challenges Together

Rapid accelerations in the effects of climate change paired with new and ongoing pandemics affecting global health – including obesity and COVID-19 – create the imperative to find solutions that address multiple challenges at once. This session is part of an emerging effort to advance research to help individuals and communities engage in behaviors that synergistically benefit both human health and the global environment. Internationally recognized leaders from a diverse set of climate and health research organizations will share evidence-based principles, best practices, and lessons learned for successful transdisciplinary research. Each speaker will provide brief remarks and participate in a moderated discussion focused on strategies for identifying and building successful collaborations and partnerships, developing novel research questions, and facilitating knowledge integration across diverse perspectives. Drawing on their in-depth knowledge and broad experience, the speakers will share practical guidance to help enhance the capacity for transdisciplinary science and offer key insights for those preparing to tackle global climate and health challenges together.

Register here.

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Special Issue: The Science of Behavior Change: Implementing the Experimental Medicine Approach

A pioneering collaboration between 10 prestigious institutions across the nation has released a special issue of Health Psychology that proposes groundbreaking approaches to uncover basic behavioral processes that influence behavior change. This collaboration involves researchers at the Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research of Northwell Health, Columbia University, Medical University of South Carolina, Oregon Health & Science University, SUNY Downstate Health University, Yale University, University of California Berkeley, University of Connecticut, Harvard University, and Boston University.

 

In this special issue, the authors unveil nearly a dozen scientific tests of basic behavioral processes and two commentaries covering diverse scientific areas in behavior change interventions. They describe how investigative teams are using the experimental method to advance our understanding of what drives human behavior, such as medication adherence, mindfulness training, and episodic future thinking. Importantly, each scientific team describes how they have adhered to Open Science processes in the conceptualization and implementation of their project. With this new knowledge, researchers can move beyond a trial-and-error approach to develop powerful evidence-based tools that improve behavior change interventions across a wide range of human behavior.

 

July 31, 2020 | Society of Behavioral Medicine Presents The Fundamentals of Climate Change and Health Behavior Change

WEBINAR: The Fundamentals of Climate Change and Health Behavior Change

Friday, July 31st, 2020 (11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. EDT)

In this webinar, three experts will present research on climate change and health behavior change. Speakers will describe climate change and both the adaptive and mitigative responses by humans in response to it. Health behaviors will be discussed in the context of climate change from an individual, policy, and systems perspective. The webinar will conclude with a Q&A.

Register for the webinar

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Pilot Funding Opportunity | NIA-funded Reversibility Network

The NIA-funded Reversibility Network (PIs: Eric Loucks, Margaret Sheridan, Keith Godfrey) is designed to foster research to reverse/remediate the effects of early life adversity (e.g. abuse, neglect, poverty, racial discrimination, etc.) in mid- and later-life, and welcomes scientists to apply for pilot funding through the Reversibility Network program shown below. Applications are due on Aug. 14.

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June 23, 2020 | Dr. Donald Edmondson Presentation on The NIH Common Fund’s Science of Behavior Change Project

Dr. Donald Edmondson is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Psychiatry at Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC), and Director of the Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health (CBCH) at CUIMC. He is the PI of the NIH Common Fund’s Science of Behavior Change Resource and Coordinating Center (RCC). The overall aim of the SOBC RCC is to provide strategic leadership, efficient coordination, inspired support, and pioneer dissemination of the experimental medicine approach adopted by the SOBC network scientists to identify, validate measures, and engage health behavior change targets. In addition to his responsibilities leading the RCC, Dr. Edmondson is the PI of two cohort studies of PTSD due to cardiovascular events, and its association with secondary cardiovascular risk in acute coronary syndrome and stroke patients. He has expertise in psychological adjustment to life-threatening illness as well as psychosocial influences on CVD risk and progression. That work led to his Enduring Somatic Threat (EST) model of PTSD-like reactions in patients with acute life-threatening illnesses. In 2018, Dr. Edmondson won the American Psychological Association award for Distinguished Scientific Contribution in Early Career for his EST theory and research. He was also the first to show that the hospital environment itself contributes to patients’ subsequent PTSD-like symptoms. Dr. Edmondson founded the first emergency medicine research lab at Columbia to enroll patients in the emergency department, to ask them about their experience during evaluation for a life-threatening CVD event. In 2014, Dr. Edmondson received the Neal Miller award for early career contributions to behavioral medicine by the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research for this work.

 

Access the lecture via the following information:

Join Zoom Meeting: https://columbiacuimc.zoom.us/j/92766536481?pwd=ZksrSTJFWHUySjRBQ0Q1Q2pOR1JIZz09

Meeting ID: 927 6653 6481

Password: 396089

 

Recording | Donald Edmondson, PhD Presents The Role of Mechanism Discovery and Targeting in the NIH Stage Model

Overview: The need for effective behavioral interventions has never been greater, but existing interventions yield weak and/or difficult to replicate effects. Further, implementation of behavioral interventions at scale is rare, and may further dilute intervention effects. The NIH Stage Model provides a framework for guiding intervention development from early phase discovery through large scale implementation, and the NIH Science of Behavior Change (SOBC) program has articulated a rigorous method for incorporating the underlying mechanisms of behavior change at each stage of intervention development. This talk will discuss how the two frameworks for research complement each other, and how individual researchers can adopt practices that will yield more powerful, replicable, and informative interventions.

Recording link here.

 

COVID-19 Response Resources

Various resources are publically available for those in the research community looking for funding opportunities and research materials related to COVID-19. In an effort to collect those resources for COVID-19 research, the following links are made available here and on the SOBC Resources page.

 

1. The NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research’s (OBSSR) collection of funding opportunities specific to COVID-19 and the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Link here.

2. NIH Public Health Emergency and Disaster Research Response (DR2). NIH DR2 provides various data collection tools, resources, and training materials for public health emergencies and disasters, including the current COVID-19 pandemic. Link here.

3. PhenX Toolkit with COVID-19 related measurement protocols. Link here.