SOBC Spotlight: Interview with Amy Slep, PhD and Richard Heyman, PhD

In this Spotlight feature we focus of Amy Slep, PhD and Richard Heyman, PhD, Clinical Psychologists and Professors in the College of Dentistry at New York University. They co-direct the Family Translational Research Group. Their SOBC research examines patterns of coercive processes within parent-child and couple dyads. These coercive processes, if engaged frequently, are believed to lead to poor consequences for health behaviors such as tooth brushing, eating, and drinking.
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May 15, 2018 | OBSSR Director’s Webinar Presents: Linda K. Larkey, Ph.D., CRTT on Biopsychosocial effects of Meditative Movement (Qigong/Tai Chi) on breast cancer survivor’s fatigue and other symptoms.

Time: 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. (ET)

Register: Register for this online only event.

 

Linda K. Larkey, Ph.D., CRTT, has a notable funded research record in multiple intervention approaches to promote cancer screenings in multiple clinic and community settings. Her more recently NIH-funded projects explore the biopsychosocial effects of Tai Chi Easy/Qigong on breast cancer survivor’s fatigue, cognitive function and other symptoms. Biomarker assessments include cortisol, inflammatory cytokines complemented with self-report and objective performance and cognitive function measures. Dr. Larkey’s more recent and current work nicely models OBSSR-desired grantspersonship and researcher behavior. Larkey is professor in Arizona State University’s College of Nursing and Health Innovation and adjunct faculty with Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ. Dr. Larkey will review the broader evidence (from her own work and others’) on Meditative Movement (MM) effects on cancer survivorship, supporting the goals of her research underway in breast cancer survivors. Extended models proposing various biomolecular and neurophysiological markers as mechanisms of effects on physical and emotional symptoms, cognitive function and body composition outcomes will be discussed.

 

 

New NIH Adherence FOAs published

These new funding opportunities on Adherence direct people to SOBC resources and encourage their use:

Improving Patient Adherence to Treatment and Prevention Regimens to Promote Health

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-18-722.html  –  R01

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-18-723.html  – R21

 

This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is being issued by the NIH Adherence Network through the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) with participation from multiple NIH Institutes and Centers. This FOA calls for research grant applications which address patient adherence to treatment and prevention regimens in healthcare to promote health outcomes. This FOA accepts applications that either propose or do not propose a clinical trial(s).

Applications under this FOA are encouraged, but not required, to apply approaches and tools developed under the NIH Common Fund’s Science of Behavior Change (SOBC) Program. These include: use-inspired basic research on mechanisms of change at multiple levels of analysis; assays for self-regulation, interpersonal processes and stress that have evidence as malleable targets for behavior change (see https://osf.io/zp7b4) developed under the SOBC program; and an experimental medicine approach which requires a clear a priori specification of the intended mechanistic target(s) of an intervention, and methods that test the degree to which an experimental manipulation or intervention engages those targets.

For more information about the SOBC program, please see: https://commonfund.nih.gov/behaviorchange.

 

April 23rd, 2018 | Alia Crum, PhD Presents: Nudging Mindset: Improving Health and Motivating Healthy Behaviors

Dr. Alia Crum is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Stanford University.  She received her PhD from Yale University and BA degree from Harvard University.  Dr. Crum’s research focuses on how changes in subjective mindsets—the lenses through which information is perceived, organized, and interpreted—can alter objective reality through behavioral, psychological, and physiological mechanisms.  Her work is, in part, inspired by research on the placebo effect, a robust demonstration of the ability of the mindset to elicit healing properties in the body.  She is interested in understanding how mindsets affect important outcomes outside the realm of medicine, in domains such as exercise, diet and stress.  More specifically, Dr. Crum aims to understand how mindsets can be consciously and deliberately changed through intervention to affect physiological and psychological well-beings.  To date, her research has won several awards including the NIH New Innovator Award and the Thomas Temple Hoopes Prize.  In addition to her academic research and teaching, Dr. Crum has worked as a clinical psychologist for the VA healthcare system and an organizational trainer and consultant, creating, delivering, and evaluating workshops on mindset change and stress management for organizations including UBS, Colgate Palmolive and the United States Navy.

 

SOBC Spotlight: Interview with Dr. Johannes Haushofer

In this Spotlight feature we focus of Johannes Haushofer, PhD, Assistant Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs in the Department of Psychology at Princeton University. He founded the Busara Center for Behavioral Economics in Nairobi, Kenya, a research facility for behavioral economics studies. Dr. Haushofer’s SOBC research investigates how stress may influence health behaviors by disrupting aspects of self-regulation.

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Annual SOBC Steering Committee Meeting

The SOBC network convened on January 10-11, 2018, for the Third Annual Meeting of the SOBC Research Network Steering Committee and External Scientific Panel.

 

Many SOBC researchers have measured more than one aspect of self-regulation. Johannes Haushofer from Princeton University measured three aspects of self-regulation, including self-efficacy, executive function, and temporal discounting. For more information about Dr. Haushofer’s interesting and ambitious project and measures, see the spotlight interview in this same newsletter. Similarly, Jun Ma and Leanne Williams study self-regulation in three domains: regulation of self-reflection, cognition, and emotion. Within each domain, they measure dysregulation using several approaches. In the case of sad emotion, for example, they measure its dysregulation via passive sampling (e.g., the negative valence of text words), neuroimaging (e.g., co-activation of the brain network of the dorsal anterior cingulate, insula, and amygdala), and measurement of negative affect during affective evocative virtual reality tasks.

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