The Resource and Coordinating Center (RCC) aims to provide strategic leadership, efficient coordination, inspired support, and pioneering dissemination of the innovative experimental medicine approaches that SOBC consortium scientists adopt to identify and validate measures, and engage novel behavior change targets.

Karina W. Davidson, PhD, MASc

Principal Investigator

kd2124@cumc.columbia.edu

Columbia University Medical Center

Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health

New York, NY

Karina Davidson, PhD, MASc is Vice Dean of Organizational Effectiveness at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Chief Academic Officer at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, Executive Director of the Center for Behavioral & Cardiovascular Health, and Professor of Medicine and Psychiatry at Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons. Recently appointed as Chief Academic Officer at NYP, Dr. Davidson is responsible for creating physician leadership training programs, leading best educational practice implementation for NYP resident/fellow training, and implementing creative workplace initiatives to enhance teaching and learning in the clinical environment. In her role as Vice Dean of Organizational Effectiveness, she oversees the assessment and optimization of learning environments for medical students and improves faculty engagement, and ensures the overall effectiveness of Columbia University Medical Center. In close collaboration with NewYork-Presbyterian, Dr. Davidson has worked on various quality improvement initiatives, including leading an effort to improve patient flow through the emergency department to medicine units at multiple hospital sites. A clinical health psychologist by training, her program of research focuses on the relationship between psychosocial risk factors and their role in the course and outcome of cardiovascular disease. She has conducted randomized controlled trials of anger management and depression treatment for both hypertensive and post-myocardial infarction patients. Most recently Dr. Davidson conducted an NIH-funded randomized controlled trial to test if enhanced depression treatment vs current treatment improves healthcare costs and depression in acute coronary disease patients at sites across the U.S. Dr. Davidson was recently awarded a New York State Department of Health program project to investigate novel hospital system interventions for improving 30-day readmissions for patients presenting with heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or myocardial infarction. Dr. Davidson received her PhD in clinical psychology and her master’s degree in industrial and organizational psychology from the University of Waterloo. She has published more than 200 peer reviewed articles and book chapters, has been an NIH-funded principle investigator on over 20 grants, and is an expert in behavior and system interventions.

Donald Edmondson, PhD

Principal Investigator

dee2109@cumc.columbia.edu

Columbia University Medical Center

Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health

New York, NY

Donald Edmondson, PhD, MPH, is an Associate Professor of Behavioral Medicine in the Departments of Medicine and Psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC), Director of the Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health at CUMC, and Director of Emergency Medicine Research for the New York Presbyterian Hospital emergency department (ED). He is currently a director of Resource and Coordinating Center of the NIH Science of Behavior Change Program, which aims to identify and measure the underlying mechanisms of behavior change using an experimental medicine approach. His research on stress, health behaviors, and cardiovascular risk has been featured in the New York Times, ABC Nightly News, CBS This Morning, and other print and media outlets.

Jennifer Sumner, PhD

Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health

Co-Investigator

js4456@cumc.columbia.edu

Jennifer Sumner, PhD, is an Instructor at the Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health at Columbia University Medical Center and a Visiting Scientist at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She is a licensed clinical psychologist whose work focuses on the mechanisms by which trauma exposure contributes to negative outcomes for emotional and physical health. She takes a life-course perspective on trauma, studying mechanistic processes in children, adolescents, and adults. Her recent work has examined the pathways by which trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) contribute to cardiovascular disease, particularly in women. She is the recipient of a Career Development Award from the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute to pursue this work. Her research provides evidence that PTSD is not solely a mental health problem but also increases risk of chronic disease, and it demonstrates the need for integrated mental and physical health care. She received her BA from Pomona College and her PhD from Northwestern University.

Lisbeth Nielsen, PhD

NIH/NIA

Program Official

nielsenli@nia.nih.gov

Jonathan W. King, PhD

NIH/NIA

Project Scientist

kingjo@nia.nih.gov

Elaine Collier, MD

NIH/NCATS

Project Scientist

CollierE@mail.nih.gov

Melissa Riddle, PhD

NIH/NIDCR

Project Scientist

riddleme@nidcr.nih.gov

Acabchuk, R. L., Kamath, J., Salamone, J. D., & Johnson, B. T. (2017). Stress and chronic illness: The inflammatory pathway. Social science & medicine (1982), 185, 166.

Davidson, Karina W., and Ying Kuen Cheung. (2017) Envisioning a Future for Precision Health Psychology: Innovative Applied Statistical Approaches to N-of-1 Studies. Health Psychology Review, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 292–294.

Davidson, K. W. (2017). Waiting for Godot. Circulation, 135(18), pp. 1690-1692.

Edmondson, D., Falzon, L., Sundquist, K. J., Julian, J., Meli, L., Sumner, J. A., & Kronish, I. M. (2017). A systematic review of the inclusion of mechanisms of action in NIH-funded intervention trials to improve medication adherence. Behaviour Research and Therapy.

Edmondson, D., & Känel, R. V. (2017). Post-traumatic stress disorder and cardiovascular disease. The Lancet Psychiatry, 4(4), 320-329.

Gutierrez J., Albuquerque ALA., Falzon L. (2017). HIV infection as vascular risk: A systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis. PLoS One, 12(5), e0176686

Johnson, B. T., & Acabchuk, R. L. (2017). What are the keys to a longer, happier life? Answers from five decades of health psychology research. Social Science & Medicine.

Swaminath, A., Feathers, A., Ananthakrishnan, A. N., Falzon, L., & Li Ferry, S. (2017). Systematic review with meta‐analysis: enteral nutrition therapy for the induction of remission in paediatric Crohn's disease. Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics, 46(7), 645-656.

Wasson, L. T., Cusmano, A., Meli, L., Louh, I., Falzon, L., Hampsey, M., Young, G., Davidson, K. W. (2016). Association Between Learning Environment Interventions and Medical Student Well-being. JAMA, 316(21), pp. 2237-2252.