Corrosive couple conflict—intense conflicts between partners that may involve physical or emotional aggression—and coercive parent-child conflict—escalating conflicts between parents and children that may involve physical or emotional aggression—are a pervasive, powerful, and destructive (but modifiable) poison to a wide range of adult and child health problems. Despite strong research findings and extensive clinical literature, measures that can sensitively, easily assess these patterns of conflict, and interventions that can quickly, precisely reduce these patterns, are both underdeveloped. This project will identify, refine, and develop these tools and seek to establish the resulting impact on health behaviors and adherence to medical regimens.

OSF: https://osf.io/f82b2/

Amy M. Slep, PhD

Principal Investigator

amy.slep@nyu.edu

New York University

Department of Cariology and Comprehensive Care

New York, NY, US

Amy M. Smith Slep received a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Stony Brook University in 1995. She is now Professor in the Department of Cariology and Comprehensive Care at NYU. Along with her collaborator, she co-directs the Family Translational Research Group, which includes an array of research staff and students focused on understanding violence in families. Dr. Slep’s research focuses on many different aspects of conflict and violence in relationships and families families: the development of dysfunctional parenting, the connections between parenting and partner conflict, the dynamics of conflict escalation and de-escalation in productive and destructive conflicts, what facets of exposure to violence impact children’s functioning and how these impacts can be buffered, and how to best prevent family violence. She is also focused on how communities can promote healthy relationship and improve population risk profiles. Her work on definitions of maltreatment has resulted in definitions that are now being used throughout the U.S. military, are being implemented across the state of Alaska, have influenced the DSM, and are being considered for the ICD-11. She has overseen a number of community-based prevention trials and longitudinal studies of representative samples. She has published over 100 scientific articles and book chapters and has received more 50 federal research grants to support her work. She is a licensed clinical psychologist.

Richard Heyman, PhD

Principal Investigator

richard.heyman@nyu.edu

New York University

Department of Cariology and Comprehensive Care

New York, NY, US

Richard Heyman is co-director of the Family Translational Research Group and Professor in the Faculty of Health at New York University. His research program has focused on the development and maintenance of family problems, with a strong focus on family maltreatment and relationship distress. Dr. Heyman's current studies investigate these phenomena from the most microsocial (e.g., What dyadic processes underlie both anger de-escalation and coercive escalation? What are the mechanisms through which these processes impact health?) to the most macrosocial (e.g., Is it possible to drive down the prevalence of IPV, child maltreatment, suicidality, and substance problems by intervening on a population's risk factors, not on the problems themselves?). Recent research also includes doctor-patient communication and dissemination of effective treatments for a variety of outcomes. Dr. Heyman's research includes a focus on methodological issues, especially on identifying and rectifying problems with measurement tools. Dr. Heyman created the Rapid Marital Interaction Coding System, the most widely used system currently active for observing couples, and directs its coding center (which codes couples observations for the FTRG and for labs across the world). He received his PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Oregon.

Dave Clark, DrPH, MPH

NIH/NIDCR

Program Official

clarkd2@nidcr.nih.gov

Melissa Riddle, PhD

NIH/NIDCR

Lead Project Scientist

riddleme@nidcr.nih.gov

Beauchaine, T. P., & Constantino, J. N. (2017). Redefining the endophenotype concept to accommodate transdiagnostic vulnerabilities and etiological complexity. Biomarkers in medicine, 11(9), 769-780.

Eddy, J. M. (2017). Facing a Fundamental Problem in Prevention Science: the Measurement of a Key Construct. Prevention Science, 18(3), 322-325.

Neuhaus, E., Beauchaine, T. P., Bernier, R. A., & Webb, S. J. (2017). Child and family characteristics moderate agreement between caregiver and clinician report of autism symptoms. Autism Research.

Slep, A. M. S., Heyman, R. E., Mitnick, D. M., Lorber, M. F., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2017). Targeting couple and parent-child coercion to improve health behaviors. Behaviour research and therapy.